david hieatt

How to build a great brand with very little money. Dec 5th. London

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'How To Build A Great Brand With Very Little Money'.

Dec 5th. London. £300.

There has never been a better time to start a brand. There has never been a cheaper time, either. But when everyone has the same free tools as you, how do you stand out? The answer is simple enough:  By learning how to use those tools with greater skill than anyone else. This workshop will give you some key insights into this.

How do you beat Goliath?  It won’t be by out-spending them. But it will be by out-thinking them. It will also come from understanding what you are going to change. Understanding your purpose and how to make that mean as much to your customer as it does to you. This workshop will give you some key insights into this, too.

I am not a theorist. I have built brands from nothing with next to nothing just by understanding a few key basic rules. I shares these insights with you on my course: 'How To Build A Brand With Very Little Money. 

What Will You Learn?

How to tell your story. 
How to give your brand a voice. 
How to get people to love your brand. 
The importance of 1000 true fans. 
The real advantages of being small. 
Is your idea going to change anything. 
How to put a moat around your idea. 
How to identify a niche before others. 
The importance of being first. 
How to fund it without losing control. 
How to build a great team without employing anyone.

More Info:

 

Hire Hunger Over Talent

Fuego 3

In an ideal world you would have both these things in one person. Alas, that isn’t always possible. So if you had to choose, I would choose Hunger.

Hunger is always keen to learn. Always trying to get better. Hunger is always putting the extra hours in. Hunger doesn’t get lazy.
Over time Hunger works so hard at his thing that his Talent begins to shine above even someone with a natural gift for it. Hunger is normally insecure about his Talent. So continues to work at it. He never loses the Hunger. So just keeps putting the practice in. Malcolm Gladwell believes ‘Talent is the desire to practise’. I am pretty sure he is right on that.

Indeed Talent comes from the hunger to get better. You can’t give people hunger. You can’t train it or inspire it. They either have it in their belly or not. It comes with them when they walk in the room. Or not.

More info on my Do brand workshop - Wales. Oct 17th.
 
More info on my Do brand workshop - London. Dec 5th.
 
My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

 

Fire Quickly. And Why That Isn't As Cruel As It First Sounds.

Gutarra bajo

Not every hire works out. And both parties know it quickly. Within three months you know that, well, it isn’t going to end well. And yet companies don’t act. The person isn’t happy. The team isn’t happy.* And that can last for years. Decades, even.

Your duty is to the team, the culture, and ultimately to the purpose of the company. And, therefore, you have to do the difficult thing quickly.

The person would be happier in another job. The team would be happier with another person. And life is too short for people to be miserable. People make the mistake of being nice, and not dealing with the problem. This means the person is unhappier for longer. It may seem counter-intuitive, but there is a kindness to acting quickly.

*A players prefer to be around A players. 

More info on my Do brand workshop - Wales. Oct 17th.

More info on my Do brand workshop - London. Dec 5th.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

Make the hiring process last as long as you possible can.

Comensal

Hire Slowly. It's a great mantra for success.

Make the interview last longer. An hour is not enough. You will get to know more about them by setting them a live project. Give them a short deadline. See how they get on. It will tell you much more an interview* ever will.

Take it out of the office. Go for a run with them. Have a beer with them. See them as people. If you can’t spend time with them, do you really want to hire them?

Remember, a crazy amount of your management time will be spent on a wrong hire. A lot of your stress will come from having to deal with a wrong hire. So can you afford to spend more of your time on making the hiring process longer? Yup, I think so

Note: *Introverts don’t interview well, but can have the best ideas). 

More info on my Do brand workshop - Wales. Oct 17th.

More info on my Do brand workshop - London. Dec 5th.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

Culture is a funny thing. You can't see it. But you sure know when it's not there.

Heartolaf

 

Your company is only as strong as the people that work in it.

The people are only as strong the culture that exists within your company.

And the purpose of your company, its reason to exist, will define the culture.

Teams build a business. But culture builds a team. So your culture is pretty important.

Culture is a funny thing to talk about.

You can't see it.

You can't feel it.

But when it's not right, you can both see it and feel it.

Culture is not a big thing. Just lots of small things.



Patagonia let their people go surfing when the surf is good. At my Hiut Denim Co, every pair of jeans is signed by the GrandMasters who made them: All artists sign their work. At Nike, it created a group called the Ekins. They know Nike backwards. Some even had a Tattoo to show they were part of the elite.

When you define your purpose, it attracts like-minded people as a moth is attracted to light. So define it well.

More info on my Do brand workshop - Wales. Oct 17th.

More info on my Do brand workshop - London. Dec 5th.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

 

Teams gather around change. The bigger the change, the stronger the team.

Content factory
Your purpose will define your product. The culture of your company. The people you hire. Even your customers who buy from you. And ultimately it will define how successful you are. But perhaps the most important thing that your purpose gives everyone in the company is a clear understand of why the company exists. Everyone in the company understands what it is that you are going to change.

Change is your secret fuel. People want to be part of change. People want to be part of history. Teams gather around ideas that will change things.

That’s why your purpose matters. It builds teams who are passionate about the project. They are there to make a difference, not just to make a quick buck.

When a team is motivated, when a team understands the change it will make, even when the odds are stacked against it, it is hard thing to stop.

More info on my Do brand workshop - Wales. Oct 17th.

More info on my Do brand workshop - London. Dec 5th.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

 

 

 

 

 

Answer a need: Yours.

Popeye

There are probably lots of people out there like you. So if you have a need that no one is meeting, you may not be alone. Designing and making for yourself as the target market is no bad thing. You know the research groups are going to be quick, free and honest. So you can iterate quickly to get something that works.

The next thing is try it on close friends. If your product solves a need for them too, well, you know at that point you are on to something.

Blogger, Twitter, Vitamin Water and a bunch more products came about by answering the needs of the founders.

Your need is a good one to answer. It is valid. It is your insight. And it is good to be its biggest user, and the main target market for a while. Then once you’re happy with it, go see the rest of the world thinks.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

More info on My Do Build a Great Brand for very little money Workshop in London in Sept:  

 

Don’t listen to the cynics.

  Dark Wader

 

In a perfect world everybody will love what you make. They will say nice things, tell their friends, and write letters to say just how much they love you. (Those things can and will happen, by the way.)

The reverse is also true. No matter what you do, there will be someone out there who will hate what you do. It’s going to happen. So get used to it. And remember because you stand for something, there will be people out there who will stand against you. The more you represent a new way of doing things, the more some people will form a resistance to it.

Don’t take it personally. Think of it this way, if you did something bland, it would be neither loved or hated. And it would end up in the worst of all places: Where no one gives a hoot about your product. Indifference is the real enemy. 

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

More info on My Do Build a Great Brand for very little money Workshop in London in Sept:  

 

What is your product? It maybe different to what you think.

Llave-tuerca

Some may think Amazon’s product are books and just about everything else, but maybe it is more than that. Books, plus all the other stuff, are what they sell. But its product is speed.

Speed of finding what you want. Speed of ordering. Speed of delivery. That speed and ease is what we remember even though we can’t remember what the last book we bought from them was. It’s the speed and the super easiness that keeps us coming back for more.

So really understanding what your product is, is important. But it may be different to what we think. Amazon don’t spend much time making better books. But they spend a bunch of time trying to get you a faster book. I read the other day that they are even considering delivering books by drones.  They know it’s the last mile of the delivery where things tend to slow down. Of course, their kindle delivers a book even faster.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

More info on My Do Build a Great Brand for very little money Workshop in London in Sept:  

Stay In Beta.

Rana reina

Be always testing. Be always pushing. Be always tinkering. Never, ever-ever, stand still. Be always asking your customers to improve what you have developed.

Innovation is what separates the leader from the follower. But, more than that, it is the hungry innovator that keeps ahead. This stems from a deep-rooted curiosity about how it can be done better.

Once you stop asking that question, then you are relying on what the company did yesterday. Most companies only change when they have to, and that is already too late. Their time came, and went.

A culture of staying in beta is not an easy one. Constantly pushing, constantly trying new ways, constantly improving doesn’t make for an easy life. But at least you won’t wake up one morning and find someone has taken your business away.

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

More info on My Do Build a Great Brand for very little money Workshop in London in Sept:  

 

Useful beats cool. Always.

Dark Wader
 

Your job isn’t to be cool. Your job is to be useful. Your job is to make product that answers a common need, and to execute it uncommonly well. Its cool will stem from its utility.

How much easier it makes our lives? How much simpler it is than the old way? How much more information it delivers to us? And how that information can help us save time, money etc.

Now and again a product comes along that is so useful and so simple to use that you just can’t imagine how you managed before it. It creates a new habit.  Habits based on ‘usefulness’ are hard to break. Habits based on ‘cool’ are easy to break. They are soon replaced by something cooler.

Sometimes designers get confused about what they do. They set out to make something cooler than what is currently out there. But that is the wrong path to take.  What they should be making is something that is more useful than the old way.

That way it will find itself in continual use throughout its life, and not just while it’s the latest flavour of the month.  

My new book: Do Purpose. Why brands with a purpose do better and matter more.  

More info on My Do Build a Great Brand for very little money Workshop in London in Sept:  

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